To create more room in their overcrowded city, Bostonians filled the bay behind Boston Common with soil and gravel in the 1880s. This photograph, taken from the Massachusetts State House dome in 1857, shows the bay before it became the neighborhood now known as the Back Bay. The brand-new Back Bay was home to the YMCA until the early 20th century. Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library.

Thousands of people poured into Boston in the 19th century. Country boys left family farms to find jobs in the city’s booming factories. Sailors staggered off ships, eager to work on dry land. Irish Catholics, desperate to escape famine and poverty at home, scraped together the money to buy passage from Liverpool, England, to Boston’s Long Wharf. By the 1890s, boats carrying people from all over Europe were landing daily in the city’s harbor. Few of these new arrivals had a formal education. Many spoke no English. But they all shared a common goal: to create better lives for themselves.

Where should these newcomers go? What should they do? Some wealthy Bostonians thought a new organization—the Young Men’s Christian Association—might have the answer. Fearful that poor newcomers would stray from a righteous path, Boston’s elites supported the YMCA, hoping the organization would help young men adjust to life in the big city. Early on, the YMCA offered moral instruction through Bible-study classes. Its evening vocational classes  also helped young men learn new trades. And it encouraged youths to blow off steam in the YMCA gymnasium instead of the city’s streets or saloons.

These early years laid the foundation for today’s Y, an institution dedicated to improving the lives of all Bostonians. Although the founders of Boston’s original YMCA would hardly recognize the modern Y, the YMCA’s underlying principles of moral, intellectual, and physical development have remained consistent over the last 150 years.

« To create more room in their overcrowded city, Bostonians filled the bay behind Boston Common with soil and gravel in the 1880s. This photograph, taken from the Massachusetts State House dome in 1857, shows the bay before it became the neighborhood now known as the Back Bay. The brand-new Back Bay was home to the YMCA until the early 20th century. Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library.